How to store your fossil collection

Graham Worton the current curator and Keeper of Geology at Dudley Museum & Art Gallery tells us how to store your geological collection correctly so that information is not forgotten and collections don’t deteriorate.

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Only a geologist would buy a thing like this…

My first rock ‘n’ gem show  for three years promised to be an expensive day, so I bulked up my wallet and headed down to Cheltenham Racecourse last month to expand my collection. As I entered the show hall I had that un-natural geological excitement at the sight of “pretty rocks”. The traders had to [...]

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Ammonite bite marks!

I was reading an article last month in Deposits magazine about the evidence for belemnite’s praying on ammonites during the Jurassic and Cretaceous Periods. A few weeks ago I was asked to produce a geology education pack combining rocks, fossils and mineral specimens from Wednesbury Museum and Art Gallery. After searching through the huge and diverse range [...]

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Plesiosaur Man!

Geology Matters roaming reporters caught up with Dr Adam Smith, the Natural Science Curator at the Thinktank Birmingham Science Museum, to discuss his journey into his current job and his key interest, plesiosaurs. What is your background? I have always been interested in fossils and dinosaurs from a very early age and knew that I [...]

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What is a trace fossil?

A trace fossil is the evidence of past life sometimes referred to as an ichnofacies. This includes burrows, feeding trails, footprints and animal faeces (coprolite). They help us to work out how particular organisms would have lived and how they would have moved around. Even though we make traces everyday, they are often not preserved. [...]

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The importance of microfossils

Graham Worton, the Keeper of Geology at Dudley Museum and Art Gallery, explains why tiny fossils known as microfossils are so important in dating rocks and economic resources.

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Modes of Life

Today organisms either live on the land or in the sea; some can move between both for particular reasons such as to lay eggs. This applied to fossils too because they had different modes of life for which they adapted and rapidly evolved to suit the environment in which they lived. For marine fossils there are [...]

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What are the differences and similarities between bivalves and brachiopods?

Both Bivalves and brachiopods are a type of shell with a living organism within the valves. Although they may look similar at a first glance, there are a few differences between them which become obvious with a close up look at them. Firstly bivalves are from the phylum known as Mollusca (molluscs), whereas brachiopods have [...]

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Trilobites made simple

Graham Worton, the Keeper of Geology at Dudley Museum and Art Gallery, talks about trilobites and how they got their name. He talks about the famous ‘Dudley Bug’ Calymene blumenbachii and how it is one of the best fossils in the world.

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Trilobites

A trilobite is part of a group of animals known as arthropods. They are from the class Trilobita. Although trilobites are now extinct they first appeared 528 million years ago during the Cambrian Period. They eventually became extinct during the End-Permian mass extinction 251 million years ago. In total there were more than 17,000 different species [...]

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